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4 Useless Skills That Will Not Get You Laid

17 Feb, 2010 News
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When it comes to meeting girls few and far between would be impressed by you if tried to pick them up with these “skills”. In no particular order let’s take a look at 4 of them that will help you hold on to your V card.

Pen Spinning

Pen spinning or pen twirling is a form of object manipulation that involves the deft manipulation of a writing instrument with one’s hands. Although it is often considered a form of self-entertainment (usually in a school/office setting), multinational competitions and meetings are sometimes held. It is a form of contact juggling.

Pen spinning is known as “pen mawashi” or, more disparagingly, “rōnin mawashi” “college student spinning” in Japan where the pastime has been popular since at least the 1970s, and where the Pen Spinning Association Japan is now dedicated to promoting the aspiring art form. While its origins remain unclear, pen-twirling is quickly gaining international popularity through on-line video sharing and forums. According to Masaki Tsukada, chairman of the Japanese pen spinners, pen spinning now has dedicated movements in South Korea and the United States.

Cup Stacking

Sport Stacking (also known as cup stacking or speed stacking) is an individual and team sport that involves stacking specialized plastic cups in specific sequences in as little time as possible. The governing body setting the rules is the WSSA (World Sport Stacking Association). Participants of sport stacking stack cups in pre-determined sequences, competing against the clock or another player. Sequences are usually pyramids of three, six, or ten cups.

There are three sequences stacked in official Sport Stacking events, that are defined by the official Rule Book handed out by the WSSA:

* 333: The stacker must create three pyramids of 3 cups each and then down stack the cups back into nested stacks of 3 in the order that they were upstacked.
* 363: Uses 12 cups. The stacker must stack up three pyramids made up of three cups on the left, six cups in the center, and three cups on the right (3-6-3) and downstack it to the three nested stacks.
* Cycle: Uses 12 cups. This is a sequence of stacks in the following order: a 3-6-3 stack (see above), a 6-6 stack (two pyramides of six cups stacked up and down into one stack containing all twelve cups altogether) and a 1-10-1 stack (a pyramide of ten cups in the middle), finishing in a down stacked 3-6-3.

Solving The Rubiks Cube

Here are a number of speed cubing competitions that take place around the world.

The first world championship organized by the Guinness Book of World Records was held in Munich on March 13, 1981. All Cubes were moved 40 times and lubricated with petroleum jelly. The official winner, with a record of 38 seconds, was Jury Froeschl, born in Munich. The first international world championship was held in Budapest on June 5, 1982, and was won by Minh Thai, a Vietnamese student from Los Angeles, with a time of 22.95 seconds.

Since 2003, the winner of a competition is determined by taking the average time of the middle three of five attempts. However, the single best time of all tries is also recorded. The World Cube Association maintains a history of world records. In 2004, the WCA made it mandatory to use a special timing device called a Stackmat timer.

In addition to official competitions, informal alternative competitions have been held which invite participants to solve the Cube in unusual situations. Some such situations include:

* Blindfolded solving
* Solving the Cube with one person blindfolded and the other person saying what moves to do, known as “Team Blindfold”
* Solving the Cube underwater in a single breath
* Solving the Cube using a single hand
* Solving the Cube with one’s feet

Of these informal competitions, the World Cube Association only sanctions blindfolded, one-handed, and feet solving as official competition events.

In blindfolded solving, the contestant first studies the scrambled cube (i.e., looking at it normally with no blindfold), and is then blindfolded before beginning to turn the cube’s faces. Their recorded time for this event includes both the time spent examining the cube and the time spent manipulating it.

Insane Juggling

Juggling can be categorized by various criteria:

* Objects juggled

Balls, clubs, rings, diabolos, devil sticks and cigar boxes are several types of objects that are commonly juggled. Other objects, such as scarves, knives, pineapples, flaming torches and chainsaws, may also be used.

* Method of juggling

The classical and best known form (toss juggling) is throwing and catching objects in the air without touching the ground. Bounce juggling is bouncing objects (usually balls) off the ground. Contact juggling is manipulating the object in constant contact with the body.

* Performance style

This may include the gentleman juggler — using everyday objects such as hats, canes, plates, wine bottles and cigars; comedy juggling — the juggling skill is secondary to the comic character and jokes of the performer; sport themed — the performers dress in sporting attire and juggle sports equipment such as tennis rackets, footballs, or even snooker balls; traditional circus style — presenting pure skill with precision, skill and panache. Cultural extensions of the traditional circus style include: Chinese circus — using mainly rings and badminton rackets, fantastic costumes, concentrating on numbers juggling; Russian folk — colourful costumes and characters, unique props with acrobatics.

* Number of objects juggled

In trick juggling, the main aim is to perform exceptionally skilful and impressive manipulations with the objects juggled. Numbers juggling, by contrast, has the goal of juggling as many objects as possible.

* Number of jugglers

Juggling is most commonly performed by an individual. However, multiple-person juggling is performed by two or more people. Some method of passing between the jugglers is used — this can be through the air (as in toss juggling), bounced off the ground, simply handed over, or numerous other ways depending on the objects and the style of juggling. For example, two club jugglers may stand facing each other, each juggling a 3-club pattern themselves, but then simultaneously passing between each other. Back-to-back juggling is also possible, and other configurations.

* Sport Juggling

Juggling is sometimes done as a sport (competing in competitions such as The World Juggling Federation). Organizations such as the WJF promote sport juggling and reward pure technical ability and give no credit for entertainment, or for juggling with props such as knives or torches.

The object, method, style and number of jugglers can vary. For example, a single juggler could be juggling different objects (say a ball, a club and an orange), could start by toss juggling them, then start bouncing the ball as part of the routine, and finally start passing the objects back and forth with a second juggler.

Juggling world records are tracked by the Juggling Information Service Committee on Numbers Juggling (JISCON). All the records listed on the JISCON page represent the longest runs with each number and prop that has been authenticated using video evidence. As of September 2006, the records for each prop are:

* Rings/Plates: 13 rings for 13 catches by Albert Lucas in 2002.
* Balls/Beanbags: 12 beanbags for 12 catches, first done by Bruce Sarafian in 1996.
* Clubs/Sticks: 9 sticks for 9 catches, first done by Bruce Tiemann in 1996.

Each of these records is what is known as a “flash”, meaning each prop is thrown and caught only once. Some jugglers, and some juggling competitions, do not consider a flash to be “real juggling” and use “qualifying juggle” (a term taken from the International Jugglers’ Association’s Numbers Competition) to mean each prop is thrown and caught at least twice. The JISCON records for qualifying runs are:

* Rings: 10 rings for 64 catches by Anthony Gatto in 2005.
* Balls: 10 beanbags for 23 catches by Bruce Sarafian in 2001.
* Clubs: 8 clubs for 16 catches by Anthony Gatto in 2006.

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5 Comments

  1. I think the Rubik's Cube kid is probably doing a lot more with his feet than just solving the Rubik's Cube puzzles.

  2. Ok, it's obvious you went to Shotaro Makisumi's website and basically listed most of his hobbies as yuor excuse for not getting women. Let me guess, along the other 4 items you mention, Dvorak typing and math are probably also on the honorable mention list.

  3. Gee, i wonder if my comment will be posted since the "Administrator" must honor it before "publishing".

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